SELECTIVE CAMOUFLAGE IS PROBABLY INHERENT WITHIN GENOMES : A FIELD NOTE

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Published: 2014-01-04

Page: 21-26


HIT KISHORE GOSWAMI *

Retired Professor of Genetics, 24, Kaushalnagar, P.O. Misrod, Bhopal (MP) 462047 India

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Majority of species among animals have inherent genetic capability to express “camouflage” in their behavior as an alternative device of saving themselves from being “hunted” ensuring survival . This is a physiologically controlled instinct to be expressed in individual’s behaviour because the adaptive camouflage identifies colour on both sides. In other words, individuals have inherent instinct to be aware of “their colour” and the colour of their expected background which could minimize their identity. These are evolutionary adaptive instincts whose controlling sequences have been randomly distributed among genomes of animal kingdom. I as a student of evolutionary and behavioural genetics have observed and studied in detail such an “instinct” among mosquitoes, flies and several grasshoppers. Such a camouflage instinct is different from camouflage generated by the incumbent species on account of mimicry.


How to Cite

GOSWAMI, H. K. (2014). SELECTIVE CAMOUFLAGE IS PROBABLY INHERENT WITHIN GENOMES : A FIELD NOTE. BIONATURE, 34(1), 21–26. Retrieved from https://globalpresshub.com/index.php/BN/article/view/572

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