Nutritional Impact of the Use of Luffa cylindrica (Sponge Seeds) in Livestock Feed, Anti-Nutrient Factors Analyzes and Incorporation Decision

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Published: 2023-12-30

Page: 59-67


Adeosun, Y. M. *

Department of Agricultural and Bio-Environmental Engineering, The Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.

Orimaye, O. S.

Department of Agricultural and Bio-Environmental Engineering, The Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.

Ogunnaike, A.F.

Department of Agricultural and Bio-Environmental Engineering, The Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Background and Objectives: Luffa cylindrica belongs to the family of cucurbitaceous. Commonly grown in the wild and abandoned building, the sponge in the whole fruit holds the seeds with fibrous netting which has industrial application as well as water filters. The Luffa cylindrica seeds were investigated for the anti-nutrients to determine the desirability or otherwise of incorporating the seeds into poultry feed as a supplement.

Materials and Methods: The milled Luffa cylindrica seeds were divided into seven equal parts with each part bearing a laboratory identification number. The four parts with the laboratory identification number 20120353, 20120354, 20120355, 20120356 which were for verification of Anti-nutrient content were heated to the temperatures of (Raw 550C, 750C, 1000C) respectively. The remaining three parts with laboratory identification numbers 20120898, 20120999, 20120900 heated at temperatures 550C, 750C, 1000C respectively and subjected to proximate analysis.

Results: The laboratory analysis indicated the raw Luffa cylindrica seeds contained Tannin 0.45%, Cyanide 0.036%, Phytate 0.015%, Oxalate 0.021%, Saponin was not detected. Heating at 750C, the tannin, cyanide, phytate and oxalate content went down to 0.12%, 0.01%, 0.008% and 0.008% respectively.

The optimal levels of Protein, CHO, Crude Fibre, Ash and Fats, the major livestock feed components for optimal performances, were respectively 18.77%, 20.44%, 40.78%, 1.73% and 10.56% at 750C heating.

Conclusion: From the result, it was indicated that the anti-nutrient level in the Luffa cylindrica seed can be brought down to a tolerable level by heating and also reduces the nutritive contents of the seeds. At 750C heating, the optimal nutrient levels and the tolerable safe anti-nutrient level in the Luffa cylindrica were achieved.

Keywords: Potential, Luffa cylindrica, incorporation, nutrient and anti-nutrients, feedstock production, crude-protein, bambara groundnut, cyanide


How to Cite

Adeosun, Y. M., Orimaye, O. S., & Ogunnaike, A.F. (2023). Nutritional Impact of the Use of Luffa cylindrica (Sponge Seeds) in Livestock Feed, Anti-Nutrient Factors Analyzes and Incorporation Decision. Asian Journal of Research in Biosciences, 5(2), 59–67. Retrieved from https://globalpresshub.com/index.php/AJORIB/article/view/1954

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