Non-traumatic Pneumomediastinum and Pneumoretroperitoneum in an Elderly Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis Using Systemic Steroids

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Published: 2022-06-10

Page: 58-62


Dilber Üçöz Kocaşaban

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Health Sciences, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Sertaç Güler *

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Health Sciences, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Buğra Dereyurt

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Health Sciences, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Spontaneous pneumomediastinum and pneumoretroperitoneum are clinical conditions defined by free air in the mediastinum and retroperitoneum. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum often results from bronchial hyperactivity or barotrauma. Treatment options usually include observation, analgesia, and oxygenation measures. Spontaneous pneumoperitoneum often results from secondary causes. Endoscopy, trauma, infections, iatrogenic causes are included in the etiology of the spontaneous pneumoperitoneum. Although patients are usually asymptomatic, surgical intervention may be required in some cases. The coexistence of these two clinical conditions is very rare. A male patient with rare coexistence of these two conditions is presented below.

Keywords: Emergency medicine, pneumomediastinum, pneumoretroperitoneum, prednisolone, rheumatoid arthritis (MeSH Database)


How to Cite

Kocaşaban, D. Üçöz, Güler, S., & Dereyurt, B. (2022). Non-traumatic Pneumomediastinum and Pneumoretroperitoneum in an Elderly Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis Using Systemic Steroids. Asian Journal of Medical Case Reports, 4(1), 58–62. Retrieved from https://globalpresshub.com/index.php/AJMCR/article/view/1612

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